The Art of Networking

art of networking

Image credit: Lab Manager Magazine

Networking is critical to keep you connected to the people and resources you need to excel in your career and find new opportunities. Read my latest article “The Art of Networking” in Lab Manager Magazine for advice on how to proactively build your network, featuring innovative networking tips from science professionals. Here is an excerpt from the article that discusses ways to set aside time for networking activities:

Between work and personal life, it may seem impossible to add in networking activities, but you can make time by creating a networking plan that includes manageable goals. For example, you could set personal goals to spend ten minutes a week on LinkedIn group discussion boards, meet one new contact a week, and attend one national conference a year. Also, conserve time by crossing people off your list who won’t respond to your emails (e.g., three strikes and they are out) or negative people who constantly criticize you. By being proactive in your networking approaches and setting achievable goals, you can build a professional network with mutually beneficial relationships for future career success.

Read the full article in the September 2015 issue of Lab Manager Magazine.

What’s your best networking tip?

networkWhat’s your best networking tip? I will feature tips in an upcoming Lab Manager Magazine article on networking as a critical career tool. I would love to share your advice with other scientists and lab managers who are looking to advance their careers. Please post tips as a short comment below by Friday, July 10, along with your name, professional title and organization*. Selected tips will then be published in the article. I look forward to learning some great tips from all of you!

Webinar On Demand: How to Develop a Career Exit Strategy

In case you missed it, my Bio Careers webinar “How to Develop a Career Exit Strategy” is now available on demand. You can find the archived video and a description of the webinar below. Feel free to reach out to me with any follow-up questions on the topic or if you need help in brainstorming exit strategy options.

Description: Do you know what you would do if your research or teaching position ended in a few months? With the volatile nature of science funding, early-career scientists need to plan ahead for unexpected career transitions.

In order to avoid panicking and taking the first position that comes your way, an exit strategy can be deployed, while refocusing efforts on your ultimate career goals. This strategy can be a short-term position, volunteer work or other activity to stay active in your field and maintain a professional image.

In this webinar, we will discuss exit strategy options, how to use an exit strategy to enhance your skill sets and ways to keep moving forward during career transitions. For more information on the concept of a career exit strategy, read the Bio Careers blog post “What’s Your Career Exit Strategy?” by Donna Kridelbaugh in advance of the webinar.

Beyond the Bench: Taking Your Career to the Next Level

Oct14-CoverStory_640x360You can read my latest career insights article “Beyond the Bench: Taking Your Career to the Next Level” in the October 2014 issue of Lab Manager Magazine. The article features practical advice from three ambitious science professionals on how to keep your career moving forward and upward. A special thanks to Dr. Bridget Fisher of Seattle Biomed, Rose Mary Casados of Cola Resources, Inc. and Dr. Jim Rancourt of Polymer Solutions for taking the time to share their knowledge with scientists who may be ready to advance their careers to the next level. An excerpt from the article is featured below:

“Managing a lab requires dedication and self-sacrifice to keep operations running smoothly and to support the work of everyone around you. Too often these valuable qualities are the very things that hold lab professionals back from focusing on their own career development.

As daunting as it may seem, you deserve to take time to reflect on whether your career is headed in the right direction and then map out the best way to get where you want to go.

In this article, you will meet three highly talented and ambitious scientists who have advanced beyond the bench to satisfying careers in research, business development, and entrepreneurship. Each professional provides practical advice on ways to gain the skills and education necessary to make an upward career transition, all while still working at the bench to support yourself financially.

Although they are on divergent career tracks, these individuals share a common drive to pave their own roads to success.”

[Read the full article in the October 2014 issue of Lab Manager Magazine.]

Join me for Bio Careers Webinar on Thursday 10/9, 1 pm ET

Please join me this Thursday, October 9th from 1-2 pm ET when I present a live Bio Careers Webinar on the topic of “How to Develop a Career Exit Strategy”. Details on the focus of the webinar can be found below. Registration is at the Bio Careers events page.

Do you know what you would do if your research or teaching position ended in a few months? With the volatile nature of science funding, early-career scientists need to plan ahead for unexpected career transitions.

In order to avoid panicking and taking the first position that comes your way, an exit strategy can be deployed, while refocusing efforts on your ultimate career goals. This strategy can be a short-term position, volunteer work or other activity to stay active in your field and maintain a professional image.

In this webinar, we will discuss exit strategy options, how to use an exit strategy to enhance your skill sets and ways to keep moving forward during career transitions. For more information on the concept of a career exit strategy, read this Bio Careers blog post “What’s Your Career Exit Strategy?” by Donna Kridelbaugh in advance of the webinar.