What’s your best networking tip?

What's your best networking tip? I will feature tips in an upcoming Lab Manager Magazine article on networking as a critical career tool. I would love to share your advice with other scientists and lab managers who are looking to advance their careers. Please post tips as a short comment below by Friday, July 10, … Continue reading What’s your best networking tip?

Self-Marketing Tip: Sharing Content with Your Network

Sharing regular content with your professional network is a quick and efficient way to increase your online presence, stay fresh in the minds of colleagues and establish yourself as a thought leader in your area of expertise. Content can be shared on social media platforms and discussion boards (e.g., LinkedIn), through your personal website, by … Continue reading Self-Marketing Tip: Sharing Content with Your Network

Recap: #ECRchat on How to Develop a Career Exit Strategy

As host of a recent live Twitter chat via #ECRchat on "How to Develop a Career Exit Strategy", I challenged early-career researchers to think about the question, “What you would do if your research position would unexpectedly end in a few months?” In order to avoid panicking and taking the first position that comes your way, an exit career strategy can be deployed while refocusing efforts on your ultimate career goals.

Career Insights: Quick guide to career fairs

My recent career insights article for ASBMB Today, the membership magazine of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is now available online. Check out “Quick guide to career fairs” to learn how to make the most of in-person and virtual career fairs, featuring advice on how to find career fairs and a prep guide.

It May Pay to Track STEM Job Market Trends

Lately, a massive debate has been ongoing on the issue of whether there is a shortage of science and engineering graduates prepared for the labor market or if this is a complete myth. Overall, it looks like it depends on how you count your numbers to form a conclusion on the topic. One thing that does seem clear is that the number of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)-related jobs fluctuate with market demands, thus the need for skilled for workers in specific fields can change over time.